The countdown is on: one year to get ready for the EU General Data Protection Regulation GDPR

On 25 May 2016 the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) entered into force. After the elapse of the 2-year transposition period, it will become directly applicable on 25 May 2018.

The new EU data protection legislation introduces substantial changes for companies dealing with personal data: As a selection, the new requirements on transparency, on proportionality as well as on documentation when processing personal data are among the key changes. These are significant challenges for companies. In addition, the new legislation substantially improves the rights of the concerned individuals – the data subjects. Thanks to the GDPR, they now have clear-cut rights with regard to companies processing their data. Inter alia the key rights include the right on information, on rectification and deletion of personal data, on restriction of processing, on portability as well as the right to object processing. As data controllers, companies have to be able to comply with all these rights.

Besides new duties and compliance obligations for companies, data protection authorities are given new competences and enforcement instruments. Standing out are the new sanctions of up to the amount of EUR 20m or 4% of the international annual turnover of the concerned company, whichever is higher.

Recommendation

Swiss companies that (e.g. because they do business in the EU) are subject to the GDPR now have one year to make the necessary adaptions to comply with the GDPR. The new requirements are to be analyzed, gaps to be identified and mitigation actions to be planned and implemented. It is important to be prepared.

Contacts:

Susanne Hofmann
Legal Compliance Leader
+41 58 792 17 12
Email

Michael Adrian Meyer
Legal Services – Senior Manager
+41 58 792 51 31
Email

Reto Häni
Partner and Leader Cybersecurity
+41 58 792 75 12
Email

Idir Laurent Khiar
Legal Services – Assistant Manager
+41 58 792 17 51
Email

The Future of Wealth Management

PwC’s 4th FS-Talk

Wealth managers are challenged by shifting client segments and disruptive technologies PwC experts discuss the key success factors for wealth managers today. Private client re-segmentation makes value-added services more important. Demands on relationship managers are increasing. Operations are under pressure to deliver higher efficiency. Listen in for pointers of where the challenges are and which technologies provide opportunities to gain a competitive edge.

Watch the latest video of our FS-Talk:

Get in contact with the speakers:

Dieter Wirth
Partner / Financial Service Leader
+41 58 792 4488
dieter.wirth@ch.pwc.com

Marcel Tschanz
Partner Advisory
+41 58 792 2087
marcel.tschanz@ch.pwc.com

Marcel Widrig
Partner / Private Wealth Leader
+41 58 792 4450
marcel.widrig@ch.pwc.com

China Economic Quarterly May 2017

What to expect from Made in China 2025 and China’s first Belt and Road Forum

The China Economic Quarterly is a market outlook prepared on a quarterly basis by PwC to share the latest economic and policy updates. In this third quarter update, the overview of China’s macro trends are followed by a summary of the main policy developments and hot topics of interest such as policy updates for a new economic zone Xiong’an New Area, insights into the “Made in China 2025” initiative and the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation to be held in Beijing on 14 and 15 May 2017.

China’s economic growth in the first quarter of 2017 delivered a much better result than market expectations. GDP increased by 6.9% year-on-year – the highest growth over the past five quarters, thanks to more pro-active fiscal stimuli and continued expansionary monetary policies.

Here are some highlights of the report:

  • The primary, secondary and tertiary (services) industries all grew, with services as a share of GDP reaching a new high of 56.6% and contributing 61.7% to overall economic growth.
  • In the first quarter of 2017, China maintained its expansionary monetary policy. The increments of Aggregate Financing to the Real Economy (AFRE) were RMB 6.93 trillion, which was RMB 226.8 billion more than the same period last year.
  • In a bid to address severe traffic congestion and air pollution in Beijing, the Chinese government announced a historic plan on 1 April 2017 to create Xiong’an New Area, a new economic zone about 100 km southwest of Beijing, with an initial area of around 100 square km and eventually expanding to nearly three times the size of New York City.
  • “Made in China 2025” is China’s first ten-year plan for manufacturing expansion and upgrading and has attracted criticisms for being “problematic” with the potential to be used to “discriminate against foreign firms in favour of Chinese competitors”.

Download PDF

 

china_economic_quarterly_nov2016To read more, you can access the latest issue of China Economic Quarterly by clicking the following links:

China:           www.pwccn.com/ceq
Hong Kong:  www.pwchk.com/ceq

 

Are public projects doomed to failure from the start? – Transformation Assurance

Public projects have a bad reputation. Is it deserved, or more a matter of expectations and the way success and failure are defined? In this critical review we take a close look at what makes public-sector IT and transformation projects different from those in other areas, the specific challenges they face, and tried-and-tested approaches to making them a success. Read more…

Contact

Marc Lahmann
Director and Leader Transformation Assurance
+41 58 792 27 99
marc.lahmann@ch.pwc.com

Digital IQ: focus on the human experience and technology integration

This is the tenth year running we’ve conducted PwC’s Global Digital IQ® Survey. The findings are sobering: enterprises all over the world are struggling to unlock the desired value. In most cases they’re overlooking fundamental integration of technology with the human experience of customers and employees. Compared with previous years there has been a decline in corporate digital IQ.

For the last ten years we and our colleagues at PwC all over the world have been polling the digital intelligence quotient of enterprises. For the 2017 edition, from September to November 2016 we asked more than 2,200 executives in 53 countries about digitisation trends and their impact on their organisation. In Switzerland 53 people took part, most of them chief information officers (CIOs) or heads of IT.

What makes a champion?

The so-called top performers, in other words organisations with sales and margin growth of more than 5%, consider the definition of ‘digital’ to be broader. They’re engaged in far-sighted, customer-oriented technology activities that go beyond mere digital technology to take in other aspects of business. When these companies run digital projects they involve cross-disciplinary teams with representatives from various fields of expertise and technology to revolutionize the human experience (employee & customer experience). They also use agile methods for the majority of projects, even those not involving software development.

Where do Swiss companies stand out?

Executives at Swiss companies rate the digital IQ of their CIO by international standards higher than their counterparts abroad (89% in Switzerland versus 83% worldwide). But the figure for CEOs is lower than the global average (54% versus 62%).

When it comes to innovativeness, Swiss companies do less well by international standards, with only 54% systematically venturing to take on new technologies (versus 76% in other countries). Swiss organisations take a different approach to exploring new technologies than their counterparts abroad, and are more likely to join forces with other industry leaders or technology vendors.

What determines digital success?

Digital initiatives are successful when aligned with a digital strategy that’s clear and understandable for all the stakeholders involved and that brings about changes in corporate culture. Transformation always has to take account of the perspectives of employees and partners such as suppliers and customers.

Digitally ambitious enterprises are able to draw together different aspects to enable harmonious, value-adding transformation. By integrating the business, the customer and employee experience, and the relevant technologies, they’re able to achieve lasting competitive advantage.

Want to know more about our study? You’ll find a summary of the Swiss findings here. You can also download the international edition of the Global Digital IQ® Survey:

Global Digital IQ Survey

Contact

Christoph Müller
Senior Manager, CIO Advisory
+41 58 792 27 86
christoph.mueller@ch.pwc.com

Axel Timm
Partner, Business Technology
+41 58 792 27 22
axel.timm@ch.pwc.com

Holger Greif
Partner, Advisory
+41 58 792 13 86
holger.greif@ch.pwc.com

Prospects for Future Economic Cooperation between China and Belt & Road Countries

The Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation (BRF) was held in Beijing from 14 to 15 May 2017. According to China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 29 heads of states and governments attended the highest level of international conference held by China since the major initiative was put forward by President Xi Jinping in 2013. Economic cooperation is expected to be the top priority of this forum. So which areas are likely to achieve breakthroughs?

In our latest PwC analysis on the B&R initiative, Prospects for Future Economic Cooperation between China and Belt and Road Countries, we look at how the B&R initiative is reshaping the future economic cooperation between China and B&R countries.

Here are the major future prospects for economic collaboration between China and B&R countries:

  • Signing free trade agreements may be the most effective way for China to expand its trade with B&R countries
  • Opening up stock and bond markets for B&R countries will provide more investment opportunities for Chinese business
  • Promoting RMB internationalisation in major B&R economies rather than in the developed countries is more likely to be successful
  • Domestic preferential policy support will be critical in encouraging Chinese companies to invest more in the B&R countries

Read Attachment

EUDTG Newsletter March – April 2017

EU direct tax law is a fast developing area. This presents taxpayers, in particular groups and multinational corporations that have an EU or European Economic Area (EEA) presence, with various challenges.

The following topics are covered in this issue of EU Tax News:

CJEU Cases

  • Belgium: CJEU judgment on interpretation of the subject-to-tax requirement of the Parent-Subsidiary Directive: Wereldhave
  • Belgium: AG Opinion on interest deduction limitation in light of the Parent-Subsidiary Directive: Argenta
  • Germany: CJEU referral on the German CFC rules: X

National Developments

  • Belgium: Supreme Court does not allow withholding tax refunds for dividends received by investment companies before 12 June 2003
  • Belgium: CJEU referral by the Commission of Belgium over the discriminatory tax treatment of foreign real estate income
  • Finland: Supreme Administrative Court confirms tax treatment of dividend income from third countries to be in line with Articles 63 and 65 TFEU
  • Italy: Amendments to the NID and Patent Box Regime
  • Norway: Government’s response to ESA’s decision on the compatibility of the Norwegian interest limitation rules with the freedom of establishment
  • Poland: Supreme Administrative Court judgment on the settlement of foreign branch losses
  • Spain: Supreme Court judgment on State aid recovery procedure
  • United Kingdom: England and Wales High Court judgment regarding repayment of stamp duty reserve tax: Jazztel plc v The Commissioners for HMRC
  • United Kingdom: The Great Repeal Bill White Paper

EU Developments

  • EU: European Parliament clears way for formal adoption of ATAD II by the ECOFIN Council
  • EU: Update on EU proposal for public country-by-country reporting
  • EU: Council adopts conclusions on EU relations with the Swiss Confederation
  • EU: Informal ECOFIN Council held in Malta in early April

Fiscal State aid

  • Greece: CJEU judgment on State aid implemented by Greece: Ellinikos Chrysos AE
  • Italy: CJEU judgment on Italian bankruptcy procedure: Marco Identi

Read the full newsletter here.

This EU Tax Newsletter is prepared by members of PwC’s international EU Direct Tax Group (EUDTG).

Further information about our service offerings in EU taxes: www.pwc.com/eudtg

PwC-Immospektive Q2/17

Interpretation of the FPRE real estate meta analysis Q2/17

Swiss economy regains it’s confidence. While revenues in the construction industry remain above average the market for rental apartments is seeing bad omens for the first time. The forecasted economic growth is optimistic and likely to bring a pick-up in demand for office space.

More information

Contact

Kurt Ritz
Partner, Real Estate Advisory
+41 58 792 14 49
kurt.ritz@ch.pwc.com

Marie Seiler
Director, Real Estate Advisory
+41 58 792 56 69
marie.seiler@ch.pwc.com

Samuel Berner
Real Estate Advisory
+41 58 792 17 39
samuel.berner@ch.pwc.com

Financial Reporting Webcast – 15 June 2017

Going digital – meeting online

In recent years many professionals have taken advantage of our Stay Smart events to get up to speed on the latest developments in IFRS relevant to the current financial reporting season. We are writing to invite you to our 2017 programme. As in the past we aim to give you the opportunity to find out about and discuss important changes in financial reporting.

This year’s spring programme will take the form of a one hour webcast including a Q & A session, accompanied by a live chat throughout. We will have a focus on the upcoming interim reports and also look at the areas of focus recently published by the SIX exchange regulation. You will be updated on the latest developments and trends in pension accounting, including risk sharing, and we will share insights on the implementation of the new revenue and leasing standards.

Free of charge, this format is designed to fit into your schedule more flexibly. You will get information on the latest changes in compact form, and you will still have the opportunity to interact live with peers and PwC’s specialists. The autumn programme will again take the form of half day events at various venues throughout Switzerland; programme and dates will be communicated in due course.

We cordially invite you to take part in the webcast. Please see the programme for more details.

Registration

Please register online 2 days before the webcast at the latest. We will confirm your registration, including the login details for the webcast.

Register now

Programme

  • All you need to know about interim reports in accordance with IAS 34
  • Current developments and trends in pension accounting
  • Insights into implementation of the new revenue and leasing standards
  • Discussion/Wrap up

Date and Time

Thursday, 15 June, 10am – 11am

 

 

 

 

 

SWIFT Customer Security Programme – mandatory specifications to protect your local SWIFT infrastructures

The growing number of cyber-attacks, including those on the local infrastructures of SWIFT participants, has prompted SWIFT to create a security programme for its participants in order to fight together against cyber threats.

SWIFT published its Customer Security Programme in April 2017. It defines specific requirements to be met by all connected participants. The programme aims to improve the exchange of information within the SWIFT community, to ensure a high level of security for the local SWIFT infrastructure of participants, and to put in place an assurance framework to counter the ever growing number of cyber threats and strengthen the ability of SWIFT participants to combat cyber-attacks.

SWIFT Customer Security Programme

The programme calls upon all SWIFT participants to implement a control and assurance framework. The control framework consists of a set of 16 mandatory and 11 advisory security controls. The controls are based on existing SWIFT security guidelines, and are in line with good practice standards such as NIST, ISO/IEC 27002 and PCI-DSS. The mandatory controls establish a security baseline for the entire SWIFT community. SWIFT also recommends implementing the advisory controls to provide optimal protection for local SWIFT infrastructures.

Demands placed on SWIFT participants

The SWIFT Customer Security Programme will come into force on 1 January 2018. As well as applying to financial service providers, it is also valid for all companies that participate in the SWIFT network. Before the introduction of the programme, each SWIFT participant must conduct a self-assessment and notify SWIFT of its status regarding compliance with the controls (by the end of 2017). From 2018, all participants must confirm their compliance with controls on an annual basis. This confirmation can be provided via a self-assessment (self-attestation), internal audit (self-inspection) or external audit (third-party inspection). Participants are free to choose the type of confirmation they wish to submit. SWIFT will however also carry out regular spot checks of confirmations via internal or external audits for quality assurance purposes.

SWIFT participants must consider the following points in particular:

  • Should only the mandatory controls be implemented, or also the advisory ones?
  • How should the assurance framework be structured? Is self-assessment sufficient, or should an internal or external audit be conducted on a regular basis?
  • Should the status regarding compliance with controls be made public to other SWIFT participants?
  • How can it be ensured that controls continue to be adhered to in the future?

The support we offer you

SWIFT Readiness Assessment

We can help make sure you comply with the SWIFT requirements by 1 January 2018 by assessing your current status and highlighting any gaps.

SWIFT control support

We can provide support for the implementation of controls by means of a post-implementation review.

SWIFT compliance confirmation

We can assist you with your annual confirmation of compliance with SWIFT requirements.

Please feel free to contact our experts if you are interested in the topic.

More information

Contacts

Jens Probst
Director, Systems & Process
Assurance
+41 58 792 29 59
jens.probst@ch.pwc.com

Claudia Hösli
Senior Manager, Specialist Cyber Security
+41 58 792 14 85
claudia.hoesli@ch.pwc.com

Marco Schurtenberger
Senior Manager, Specialist Cyber Security
+41 58 792 22 33
marco.schurtenberger@ch.pwc.com