PwC & HR Today Survey “Future of work”

Your chance to win a prize: invitation to take part in the survey

 

To the survey

 

PwC has joined forces with HR Today to present a series of studies entitled HR Today Research. The aim is to foster dialogue with the professional HR community and encourage people to participate in the HR-specific survey. Take part and you could win a night for two in one of the five star hotels in the Victoria Jungfrau Collection.

The study results will be published in the spring of 2017 via the channels of HR Today and presented at an event.

More information can be found here.

Young Workers Index 2016

Every person is born with potential: the key is unlocking that potential. So, how can we provide opportunities that empower young people to take ownership over their own future outcomes?

You can download our new Young Workers Index report by clicking below, where we discuss how governments and businesses can reap the rewards from playing their part in making this happen. You can also explore key findings from the research and use our new interactive tool to delve deeper into the data below.

 

Download the report

Studies by PwC on women in business

In connection with International Women’s Day, in the last few days PwC has published three studies on the theme of women in business.

International_Womens_day_1

Modern mobility: moving women with purpose
More women than ever are internationally mobile. But there’s still a major gap between the aims and aspirations of these women and what their employers are offering. The report brings together the views of 134 global mobility executives and 3,937 professionals from over 40 countries.

 

International_Womens_dayPwC Women in Work Index 2016
The index ranks 33 OECD countries according to a benchmark based on key indicators of female economic empowerment: gender pay equality, the rate of female labour force participation (both in absolute terms and by comparison with men), female unemployment, and women in full-time employment. As in previous years, Scandinavian countries top the rankings. Switzerland remains in tenth place.

 

International_Womens_day_2Next Generation Survey 2016: The Female Perspective
This report looks at the perspective of female family business leaders on the basis of a survey of 73 women in 25 countries. Despite the fact that companies with women at board or operational management level often do better, a lot more grassroots work will have to be done if more women are to get the opportunity to take on these roles. The report concludes that one in five women don’t believe they have the same chances of success as men in the family business.

Please contact Charles Donkor or Jasmin Weisshaar if you have any questions.

 

People strategy for the digital age – A new take on talent

Businesses face some pressing questions about their future talent pipelines and people strategy. The pace of technological, political and economic change has left CEOs standing on constantly shifting. Just as the industrial revolution did one and a half centuries, the digital revolution is reshaping the way we live our lives and the way we work. It’s also forcing a fundamental transformation of business – changing the relationship with customers, bringing new entrants and their disruptive technologies, driving new channels, products and services, breaking down the walls between industries and, in many cases, forcing a basic rethink of the business model.

The speed of change makes it almost impossible to predict the future with any degree of certainty.
In such a climate, organisations need a credible and forward looking leader; a role that has never been more critical. CEOs need to understand how technology can improve their business and the customer experience, and plan for things that seem a distant dream. Denise Ramos, CEO of ITT Corporation, puts it like this: “You have to create multiple futures and multiple options for your company, because you don’t know when the world’s going to look like three to five years from now.”

One of the biggest headaches for CEOs is making sure that the organisation has the right people to cope with what lies ahead. There’s the basic question of planning for the skills that are needed now and in the future: Which roles will be automated? What new roles will be needed to manage and run emerging technology? What skills should the company be looking for, and training their people for? Where will we find the people we need?

But more importantly, CEOs need to be sure that the business is fit to react quickly to whatever the future may throw at it – and that means filling it with adaptable, creative people, working in a culture where energy fizzes and ideas spark into life. If they can’t be found, they must be created.

Whatever technological innovations are ahead, it’s the people that will make the difference between eventual success and failure. That’s why CEOs need a people strategy for the digital age.

Read more…

People strategy for the digital age – A new take on talent

PwC Golden Age Index – how well are countries harnessing the power of older workers?

One of the key megatrends affecting all developed countries is an ageing population. Harnessing the potential of older workers will therefore become an increasingly important source of competitive advantage for both nations and businesses.

To explore how the OECD economies compare with each other in this regard, PwC has developed a new ‘Golden Age index’ comparing how well they are utilising workers aged 55 and over. The index includes relative employment, earnings and training rates for older workers for 34 OECD countries over the period since 2003.

Key findings include:

  • Most OECD countries’ employment rate has risen over time, so our relative index performance remains middling (19th out of 34)
  • If e.g. the UK could boost its employment rate for 55-69 year olds to match that of Sweden, the best performing EU country, this could boost annual UK GDP by around £100 billion (5.4%).
  • The top five countries in the index are Iceland, New Zealand, Sweden, Israel and Norway, with Chile a fast riser since 2003 in 6th place. Switzerland is on place 11.
  • The US, South Korea, Japan and Estonia round out the top 10 on the index.

PwC Golden Age Index – how well are countries harnessing the power of older workers?

Read more…

Female millennials in financial services

Female Millennial in FSStrategies for a new era of talent

Diversity and inclusiveness are now competitive imperatives within an evolving financial services (FS) marketplace; investors want it, boards want it and clients demand it.

As businesses look to broaden their talent pool and attract people with fresh ideas and experiences, nearly 60% of the FS industry leaders taking part in PwC’s latest global CEO survey say their organisation now has a strategy to promote diversity. More than three-quarters of these CEOs believe that diversity has enhanced innovation, customer satisfaction and overall business performance.

Female millennials are set to play a critical part in future FS growth. With many organisations still finding it difficult to root out aspects of their culture which could lead to excessive risk-taking or regulatory breaches, attracting more women at all levels of the organisation could provide the catalyst for a real shift in attitudes and behaviour.

So what does the generation of women entering the workforce and moving into management positions want from the organisations they work for? We’ve just carried out a survey of more than 8,000 female millennials (women born between 1980 and 1995) from around the world, of which nearly 600 are working in FS (banking and capital markets, insurance and asset management). The findings provide valuable insights into the perceptions, aspirations and characteristics of women in FS, which can help your business to define and refine strategies for recruitment, retention and career development.

Download the full report here.

If you have any further questions please contact me.

Moving HR to the Cloud?

Navigate key barriers to boost success.

It’s no surprise that more and more companies are moving their HR applications to the cloud to boost innovation, increase flexibility and control costs. The shift, now at a frenzied pace, is fueling tremendous growth in the HR technology space. It is also creating uncertainty for HR business and technology leaders who are struggling with important questions such as:

  • Is the cloud right for my organization?
  • Does it make sense to move everything to the cloud or just certain process areas?
  • Is the move paying off for the early adopters?
  • What challenges are organizations facing with their migrations to cloud?

PwC’s 2014 HR Technology Survey of nearly 270 US-based companies, including a range of industries and company sizes, provides insight into these and other important issues facing today’s HR business and technology leaders. Clearly, the shift from on-premise Human Capital Management (HCM) to cloudbased HCM applications is a significant trend that cannot be ignored. Yet, despite high levels of satisfaction, HR business and technology leaders are finding that moving to the cloud requires a transformational mindset — one that many seem to undervalue and oversimplify.

The HR technology options to enable today’s business and people strategies can be overwhelming. In this paper, we’ll first look at the industry landscape, including the types of organizations moving to the cloud, top HR technology investments, and major trends driving HR cloud adoption. Next, we’ll look at primary challenges that HR business and technology leaders are encountering along the way. We’ll also provide key considerations to help smooth the transition and help make the journey worthwhile.

Download the survey results here.

If you have any further questions please contact me.

The most extraordinary technology of all

The role of people in a digital world

Capture In the digital world, everyone can be heard and everyone can contribute. We live in an age where Twitter has created an army of frontline news reporters at major events and disasters and where community forums such as tripadvisor and glassdoor roar the opinions of millions. The omnipresence of mobile devices has accelerated this trend; last year we reached the point where the number of mobile-connected devices in circulation exceeds the world’s population. Digital success is not about securing the best technology; the true value comes from the way your people use it.

During a transformation as rapid and life-altering as the digital age, the most dangerous thing an organisation can do is lose sight of the value of its people. The best, most innovative technology in the world won’t create value on its own. Success in the digital age doesn’t come down to securing the latest technology or by cutting costs through automation; it comes down to striking the right balance between digital and human innovation. A people strategy for the digital age.

Read more here.

Developing female leaders

gender mobilityAddressing gender bias in global mobility

In many global organisations, international experience is viewed as a pre-requisite for executive and leadership roles. With just one in four outbound expatriates from Australia being female, organisations may unintentionally be limiting the progression of their high potential female employees. By exploring and addressing the barriers to female mobility, there is an opportunity to enhance both individual careers and organisational performance.

A year-long joint research project between PwC Australia and Melbourne University’s Centre for Ethical Leadership (CEL) has explored this issue in depth. Using data from interviews with Human Resources leaders, online surveys of both female and male assignees, academic literature reviews and PwC’s expatriate tax client base, a number of “hotspots” for gender bias in the assignment lifecycle have been identified. In this report we explore those bias hotspots, and provide seven strategies oganisations can employ to increase female participation in global mobility programs.

Organisations which are ready to take active steps to increase female participation in global mobility stand to benefit from developing and retaining female talent, and the positive impact this will have on diversity of their future leadership teams.

With the diversity agenda in global mobility lagging so far behind the progress made in other aspects of diversity in recent years, there is a pressing need for change.

Please contact me if you have any further questions.