Revised rules on tax at source to enter into force on 1 January 2021

On 15 December 2016, parliament finally passed amendments to the rules on taxation at source in the form of the federal act on the revision of taxation of earned income at source. On 11 April 2018, the Swiss Federal Council passed the Federal Department of Finance’s fully amended ordinance on taxation at source. Both sets of rules enter into force on 1 January 2021.

The ordinance on taxation at source concretises the new law. It contains hardly any surprises compared against the consultation, concluded in December 2017. Anyone subject to tax at source who is resident in Switzerland must, as previously (in most cantons), file a tax return if their income exceeds the threshold of CHF 120,000 (retrospective ordinary assessment). Anyone else in Switzerland with a lower income can apply to do so voluntarily.

Application in cases of quasi-residence

People resident abroad can only apply to file a tax return if they are quasi-resident in other words if 90 per cent of their global income is taxed in Switzerland. Recent court rulings relativise this figure of 90 per cent, which also means the procedure changes for people with quasi-resident status applying to file a return. They must make the application before the prescribed deadline (31 March of the following year). However, the decision is made on the basis of the tax return submitted.

The most important changes in brief

» Tariffs

Tariff D (secondary employment) is being abolished as part of the tax at source procedure on data privacy grounds. This means that all employers of a person subject to tax at source who has more than one position as an employee have to levy tax at source at the regular tariff. The regular tariff is converted to 100 per cent of the income, or 180 hours per month.  The abolition of tariff D also entails the disappearance of tariff O for German cross-border commuters.

However, tariff D will not disappear completely, but will now be used in special cases: for the refund of AHV/AVS contributions (at least one year) if an employee emigrates permanently to a country with which Switzerland does not have a social insurance agreement. In other words this tariff (D) will no longer be used by employers; only by the social security authorities. Employers will likewise not be using the new G and Q tariffs. The persons subject to tax at source drawing replacement income from the insurer, set down in section 2 of tariff D, will now be handled under tariff G. Replacement income is benefits paid directly to the person taxable at source rather than via the employer. In the same situation Tariff Q relates to Germans who have cross-border commuter status.

» Greater onus on employees

The onus is explicitly placed on employees, who must now report new circumstances (e.g. changes in marital status, the birth of children, partner taking up/leaving employment, etc.) to their employer. This is absolutely necessary for the employer to be able to calculate and levy the correct tax at source. Nevertheless, employers will have to inform their employees of this and make them aware of this obligation.

» Further concretisation anticipated

The revised legislation also entails amendments to other ordinances, including the ordinance on expatriates (ExpaV/Oexpa), most of them editorial in nature.

The actual implementation of retrospective ordinary assessments is left very open, with the cantons given considerable room for manoeuvre when it comes to applying these rules. The anticipated circular should create clarity in this respect, as well as containing numerous concrete details of uniform calculation methods for all cantons. Only this way can the amended rules on taxation at source really simplify life for employers.

Contact Us

Brigitte Zulauf
TLS Partner
Leader Corporate Support Services Switzerland, Zurich
+41 58 792 47 50
brigitte.zulauf@ch.pwc.com

QI Account Management System Open for QI Certifications

On 4 May 2018, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) updated the QI account management system and is now officially accepting QI, Withholding Partnerships (“WP”), and Withholding Trusts (“WT”) Certifications. Additionally, the IRS has announced that all QIs, WPs, and WTs must select the Periodic Review year of their certification before 1 September 2018. Please note that this deadline is also applicable for QIs, WPs, and WTs that have selected 2017 as their Periodic Review year.

Details to QI/WP/WT Periodic Review Waiver Applications

The IRS included details about Periodic Review waiver applications in its announcements, stating that all QIs, WPs, and WTs that wish to apply for a waiver must select 2015 as their Periodic Review year, complete Parts I – III of the certification, and submit its waiver application before the 1 September 2018 deadline. If the waiver application is accepted by the IRS, the QI, WP, or WT is not required to perform the Periodic Review. The acceptance or denial of a waiver application will be communicated by the IRS. If a waiver application is denied with less than six months remaining (including extensions) for the QI/WP/WT certification, then the QI, WP, or WT will be granted an additional six-month extension from the date of the waiver application denial, allowing for sufficient time to conduct the Periodic Review and resubmit a certification. Please note that if a QI/WP/WT has had its waiver application denied, the Periodic Review year is 2015. If such a QI/WP/WT wishes to select another year for the Periodic Review, the IRS FI team should be contacted at lbi.fi.qiwpissues@irs.gov. Once the Periodic Review is conducted post waiver denial, the resubmitted certification should include Parts IV and VI (if applicable).

Additional Information

The IRS has updated its certification and Periodic Reviews FAQs. Please refer to this link for access to the current FAQs.

Additionally, QIs, WPs, and WTs should consult Publication 5262 (the QI User Guide) before beginning their certifications, if needed. Publication 5262 can be accessed under this link.

Contact

Bruno Hollenstein
Partner, Operational Tax
+41 58 792 43 72
bruno.hollenstein@ch.pwc.com

Don’t be caught out by DAC6

The EU is introducing radical measures to tackle tax abuse and ensure fairer taxation by increasing the level of transparency another notch in order to detect potentially aggressive tax arrangements.

The amendment to Directive 2011/16/EU on administrative cooperation in the field of taxation (DAC6 for short) will have far-reaching consequences for tax advisors, service providers and taxpayers – including organisations and individuals in Switzerland.

DAC6 imposes mandatory disclosure requirements for arrangements with an EU cross-border element where the arrangements fall within certain “hallmarks” mentioned in the directive and in certain instances where the main or expected benefit of the arrangement is a tax advantage. There will be a mandatory automatic exchange of information on such reportable cross-border schemes via the Common Communication Network (CCN) which will be set-up by the EU.

Although the directive is not effective until 1 July 2020, taxpayers and intermediaries need to monitor their cross-border arrangements already as of May 2018. Therefore the time to act is now.

DAC6 in a nutshell

Who? Intermediaries such as tax advisors, accountants, banks and lawyers, who design, market, organise, make available for implementation or manage the implementation of potentially aggressive tax-planning schemes with an EU cross-border element for their clients as well as those who provide assistance and advice

What? Mandatory reporting by tax intermediaries (or taxpayers) and the automatic exchange of information by the tax authorities of EU member states via the Common Communication Network (CCN) for a wide range of cross-border arrangements in relation to individuals and entities.

Why? The main purpose of DAC6 is to strengthen tax transparency and fight against aggressive tax planning. It broadly reflects the elements of action 12 of the BEPS project on the mandatory disclosure of potentially aggressive tax-planning arrangements.

How? The potentially aggressive tax planning arrangements with a cross-border element need to be reported by the intermediaries to the tax authorities in the country in which they are resident. The EU member states then will share the information with all other member states via the Common Communication Network (CCN) on a quarterly basis.
If the taxpayer develops the arrangement in-house, or is advised by a non-EU adviser, or if legal professional privilege applies, the taxpayer must notify the tax authorities directly.

Penalties will be imposed on intermediaries that do not comply with the transparency measures. EU member states to implement effective, proportionate and dissuasive penalties.

Find out more about DAC6 and if you are affected online and get in contact with our experts.

Contacts

Monica Cohen-Dumani
Partner
+41 58 792 97 18
monica.cohen.dumani@ch.pwc.com

Bruno Hollenstein
Partner
+41 58 792 43 72
bruno.hollenstein@ch.pwc.com

Australia lowers Managed Investment Trusts (MITs) withholding tax for Swiss investors

Current Situation

Swiss investors currently investing into Australian Managed Investment Trusts (MITs) have not been able to benefit from the reduced 15% withholding tax rate despite Switzerland having implemented the automatic exchange of information with Australia, the reason was that the Australian government had not updated the list of eligible countries yet.

Update of list of countries with beneficial withholding tax rates

The Australian government has now announced that it will update the list of countries whose residents are eligible to access a reduced withholding tax rate of 15 per cent, instead of the default rate of 30 per cent, on certain distributions from Australian MITs. Listed countries are those which have established the legal relationship enabling them to share taxpayer information with Australia. The update will add the 56 jurisdictions that have entered into information sharing agreements since 2012.

Effective from 1 January 2019

The updated list will be effective from 1 January 2019. This measure supports the operation of the MIT withholding tax system by providing the reduced withholding tax rate only to residents of countries that enter into effective information sharing agreements with Australia.

Take away

Swiss investors investing in Australian MITs should ensure that they will benefit from the reduced tax rates. For certain structure the investment through an MIT might become an attractive alternative given the lower withholding tax rate.

We are happy to review your Australian investment structure to ensure they are as tax efficient as possible.

Contacts

Victor Meyer
+41 58 792 43 40
victor.meyer@ch.pwc.com

Benjamin De Zordi
+41 58 792 43 17
benjamin.de.zordi@ch.pwc.com

Regula Haefelin
+41 58 792 25 24
regula.haefelin@ch.pwc.com

Silvan Amberg, CFA, CAIA
+41 58 792 44 59
silvan.amberg@ch.pwc.com

Double Tax Treaty – Brazil x Switzerland

Brazilian and Swiss governments signed a Double Tax Treaty (DTT) on 3 May 2018 that regulates the income tax treatment between both countries. The DTT includes provisions to facilitate international cross border investments and transactions such as dividends, royalties, interest and capital flows and is aligned with the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) actions, such as treaty abuse provisions, mutual agreement procedure as well as exchange of tax information.

The DTT as a next step will need to be ratified by both jurisdictions in accordance with their respective domestic law. On the Brazilian side, the DTT must be ratified by the National Congress and on the Swiss side, also the parliament will need to ratify the DTT. Only once ratified by both jurisdictions, the treaty can enter into force. At this stage, it cannot be predicted when exactly the DTT will enter into force though.

Switzerland is one of the biggest investors in the Brazilian market and the DTT demonstrates the high interest in the continuous development of the commercial relationship between the countries by providing investors with clear tax rules and the same time increase transparency.

It is important to highlight that Brazil and Switzerland already signed an Automatic Exchange of Information agreement, which entered into force on 1 January 2018, which will allow the countries to share financial information regarding enterprises and individuals even if the DTT is not in force yet. Switzerland already has an attractive double tax treaty network with Latin American jurisdictions and ratifying and putting into force the Swiss Brazilian DTT will enhance Switzerland’s position for Latin American investments.

In addition, in February 2018, the OECD and Brazil also launched a joint project to examine the similarities and gaps between the Brazilian and OECD approaches to valuing cross-border transactions between associated firms for tax purposes. The project will also assess the potential for Brazil to move closer to the OECD’s transfer pricing rules, which are a critical benchmark for OECD member countries and followed by countries around the world. The development of further DTT’s as well as the intention to close the gap with the OECD also demonstrates that Brazil is seeking to align its practice to the global standards and facilitate investments.

Contact Us

Tiago Feracioli
Manager
Tel. +41 58 792 21 75
tiago.feracioli@ch.pwc.com

Matthias Marbach
Director
Tel. +41 58 792 44 76
matthias.marbach@ch.pwc.com

Stefan Schmid
Partner
Tel. +41 58 792 44 82
stefan.schmid@ch.pwc.com

Federal Tax Authorities published circular No 37A

On 4 May 2018, the federal tax authorities have published a new circular regarding the tax treatment of participation instruments for employers (circular No 37A). The circular enters into force with immediate effect.

What is it about?

Whereas the circular No 37 mainly provides guidance on the definition and individual income tax treatment of participation instruments in national and international cases, the new circular No 37A focuses on the corporate tax impact for employers resulting from participation instruments, i.e. tax deductibility of corresponding expense.

Learn more about the circular No 37A

What does this mean for employers?

The cost in connection with employee participation programs are generally tax deductible for corporate tax purposes as long as this is adequately reflected in the books. The new circular provides various examples in this respect. However, the devil lies in the detail.

We recommend you to assess the potential impact of the new guidance on your plans and processes to avoid / mitigate any tax exposure. If you have any questions regarding the circular contact Remo Schmid.

How much VAT will you pay for 1 franc of turnover in Switzerland?

Be it a necessary evil or smart compliance, VAT is a key topic – and now also concerns companies without a business location in Switzerland, from their very first franc of turnover in Switzerland.

You operate a shuttle company headquartered abroad and drive passengers to a Swiss airport. Or you are a kitchen manufacturer in the EU and equip houses in Switzerland with the latest designs. Or you are responsible for catering at an event on the Swiss side of the border. These examples have one thing in common: since 1 January 2018 all these companies have been subject to the partially revised Swiss Federal Act on Value Added Tax (VAT Act) – with far-reaching consequences.

New VAT provisions for all companies without a business location in Switzerland

If your company does not have a business location in Switzerland, the revised VAT Act introduces changes to the VAT registration obligation. Your company may be subject to Swiss VAT even if it is not established in Switzerland. The key question is whether your services have a connection to Switzerland. In principle, this is the case if your company generates turnover in Switzerland. This means that Switzerland represents a place of supply for VAT – which you will have to pay.

From the very first franc

Your tax liability in Switzerland is not determined by your turnover in Switzerland, but by your global turnover. If you generate less than CHF 100,000 from your services in Switzerland, but at least CHF 100,000 internationally, from 2018 onwards you are subject to VAT in Switzerland from the very first franc of turnover.

Low-value consignments remain exempt from tax on importation. However, under the new VAT legislation, (online) retailers that generate over CHF 100,000 of turnover per year in Switzerland through the supply of goods will be liable for VAT from 1 January 2019 onwards. In other words, you must charge Swiss VAT on services of this type.

From now on: proceed step by step

You no doubt wish to continue your business operations in Switzerland. To do so, you need an intelligent solution that avoids excessive costs and tedious complexity. We recommend proceeding as follows – if possible very soon, because the revised VAT Act has been in force since the beginning of the year.

  1. Register for Swiss VAT to receive your Swiss VAT number.
  2. Appoint a reliable fiscal representative to deal with the Swiss tax authorities on your behalf.
  3. Register for the electronic filing of quarterly Swiss VAT declarations.
  4. Submit the required quarterly VAT declarations.
  5. Keep an overview of all your correspondence with the tax authorities – including your replies.

Clever solution with Smart VAT

We have developed an online solution that is both simple and fast, and exclusively designed for businesses like yours: Smart VAT. This platform offers a number of advantages at the same time: Your VAT registration only takes a few moments. You can then continue your business activities in Switzerland without any interruptions – and with peace of mind, because you are acting fully in compliance with the law. And last but not least, Smart VAT is as simple and user friendly as online banking. And remember: registration for Smart VAT is free of charge. You simply pay a minimum annual fee for fiscal representation.

Find out more about Smart VAT here.

Contact

Julia Sailer
Director, VAT compliance services leader
+41 58 792 44 57
julia.sailer@ch.pwc.com

EMEA PE Webcast Series – Episode Four – VAT consequences of a corporate tax permanent establishment

Tuesday, 17 April 2018, 3.00 – 3.45 pm CET

After a short break, we are pleased to inform you that we will resume the PE Webcast Series, with Episode 4 – VAT consequences of a corporate tax permanent establishment.

In this webcast specialists from our international tax and VAT practice will compare the objectives and concepts of a corporate tax permanent establishment with a VAT fixed establishment (FE).

We will walk through practical examples to demonstrate the interaction of these rules, outlining the VAT consequences of creating a corporate tax PE, as well as the corporate tax position if you have a VAT FE.  As part of the discussion we will highlight trends in the application of PE and FE rules by tax authorities, leading in some cases to a blurring of the concepts.

You will have the chance to raise questions directly to our specialists.

Speakers for episode four will include:

  • Monica Cohen-Dumani – Partner, International Tax Services, EMEA ITS Leader – PwC Switzerland
  • Ine Lejeune – Partner Tax Policy, Dispute Resolution & Litigation – Law Square
  • Herman van Kesteren – Partner Indirect Taxes – PwC Netherlands

Registration Link

Complete the required registration fields and select “Submit”.
Once you have registered, you will receive the WebEx access details. The WebEx will be recorded and you will receive a link to the recording via e-mail after the event using the same details. There will be time for questions and answers with your speakers during the WebEx. Questions can also be sent in advance of the
WebEx session to the following email address: grasiele.neves@ch.pwc.com

We do hope that you will join us online!

Best regards,
Monica Cohen-Dumani

Contact

Monica Cohen-Dumani
Partner, EMEA ITS Central Cluster Leader
+41 58 792 97 18
monica.cohen.dumani@ch.pwc.com

Grasiele Teixeira Neves
International tax services
+41 58 792 98 25
grasiele.neves@ch.pwc.com

Update: Repatriation Tax (Notice 2018-26)

On April 2, 2018, the Department of the Treasury and the IRS released their third notice on the Toll Tax also known as the Repatriation Tax (Notice 2018-26)

Some of the key guidance provided in this latest notice which affect US individuals living abroad are:

  • Extension of time to pay the first installment of the Toll Tax for US individuals living abroad until June 15, 2018, the same date as the automatically-extended personal tax return deadline for these individuals.
  • Clarification on the allowable deductions for US individuals subject to the Toll Tax, who wish to make an election to be taxed similar to a US domestic corporation (i.e. §962 election)
  • US partners holding less than 5% in a partnership structure with investments in US domestic corporations may not be subject to the Toll Tax
  • If a foreign corporation filed an election to be treated as a tax-transparent entity (i.e. check-the-box election) after November 2, 2017, the Toll Tax may still be attributed to its US individual shareholders for the 2017 tax year.

From a practical perspective, US individuals (US national, US green card holder, US tax resident) residing abroad who are investors in a structure holding directly and indirectly, 10% ownership in a US domestic corporation should carefully review their toll tax exposure before June 15, 2018.

For more information, a complete copy of the notice can be found in the following link: https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/n-18-26.pdf

Contact Us

Richard Barjon, CPA
PwC | US Tax Director
+41 58 792 13 53
richard.barjon@ch.pwc.com

European Commission proposes new rules on the taxation of the digital economy

On 21 March 2018, the European Commission proposed new rules to ensure that digital business activities are taxed in a fair and growth-friendly way in the EU.

Background

While digital businesses have evolved rapidly in the recent past, the current tax rules do not fully fit the modern, increasingly digital economy, resulting often in a misalignment between the place where the profits are taxed and the place where value is created. In order to address the tax challenges from the digital economy the EU Commission presented its so-called “Digital Tax Package”, which mainly consists of two draft Directives and one Recommendation to the EU Member States. This package supports the Commission’s key priority of completing the Digital Single Market, which also takes into account the global dimension: the OECD has committed to bring forward a report on the next steps internationally by 2020.

Legislative proposals in a nutshell

Draft Directive on the corporate taxation of a significant digital presence:

  • To reform corporate tax rules so that profits are allocated and taxed where businesses have significant interaction with users through digital channels (assumption of a taxable digital presence or a virtual permanent establishment);
  • This is the EU Commission’s preferred long-term solution.

With respect to non-EU countries, not captured by this Directive, the EU Commission issued a Recommendation to the Member States for adaption of such rule via the double tax treaty (see also below).

Draft Directive on Digital Services Tax (DST):

  • To introduce a DST of 3% on certain revenues from digital activities;
  • The introduction of a DST is considered as an interim solution until the above long term solution is in place.

As a next step, both legislative proposals will be submitted to the European Council for adoption and to the European Parliament for consultation. If adopted by unanimous vote, the expected effective date would be 1 January 2020.

Legislative proposals in detail

Draft Directive on the corporate taxation of a significant digital presence (long-term, comprehensive solution)

A digital platform shall constitute a significant taxable digital presence in an EU Member State if it fulfils one or more of the following criteria:

  • Total annual revenues from digital services to users in that Member State in a taxable year exceed a threshold of EUR 7 million, and/or
  • Users of digital services in that Member State in a taxable year exceed 100’000, and/or
  • Business contracts for digital services in that Member State in a taxable year exceed 3’000.

The new rules would also change how profits are allocated to Member States in a way which better reflects how companies can create value online: for example, depending on where the user is based at the time of consumption or where the value is generated through user participation.

Such directive would apply to all companies that are resident in an EU member state. It would also apply to companies in non-EU member states rendering digital business to EU based users and customers unless there is a double tax treaty in place which does not provide for similar rules on significant digital presence and profits attribution (this is for the time being the case, since currently existing double tax treaties do typically not allow for such digital taxation). Hence the below recommendation to the EU member states to re-negotiate double tax treaties to include such digital business taxation rules.

Draft Directive on Digital Services Tax (short term, interim solution)

Unlike the common EU reform of the underlying tax rules, the interim DST would apply to revenues created from certain digital activities which under the current tax rules would not be taxed in the countries where the value is generated. This DST would only remain in force as an interim measure, until the comprehensive solution is in place. However, it would apply to any company rendering digital services in the EU irrespective whether an EU member state based company or not and irrespective of existing double tax treaties.

The tax would apply to revenues created from activities where users play a major role in value creation and which are the hardest to capture with current tax rules, such as those revenues:

  • created from selling online advertising space;
  • created from digital intermediary activities which allow users to interact with other users and which can facilitate the sale of goods and services between them;
  • created from the sale of data generated from user-provided information.

The DST would only apply to companies with total annual worldwide revenues of EUR 750 million and taxable revenues of EUR 50 million in the EU. This would help to ensure that smaller start-ups and scale-up businesses remain unburdened.

Recommendation relating to the corporate taxation of a significant digital presence

In connection with the long term Draft Directive on the corporate taxation of a significant digital presence, the EU Commission also issued an accompanying Recommendation to the EU Member States for cases where the proposed Directive would not apply, i.e. when Member States have tax treaties in place with non-EU countries (which would also be the case for Switzerland).

In particular the EU Commission recommends to Member States to amend their tax treaties with non-EU countries by a) changing the definition of permanent establishment to take into account significant digital presence and b) including rules for respective profit attribution.

For further details regarding the EU Digital Tax Package please refer to the detailed newsletter of the PwC Network EUDTG.

Implications of proposed rules for Switzerland

Although the above legislative proposals are EU Directives, the directives still impact companies operating out of Switzerland or other non-EU states, if finally adopted.

Draft directive on Digital Services Tax:
The DST would affect Swiss groups performing digital services in the EU as the tax becomes due if the user / customer is in the EU, provided they meet the thresholds mentioned above.

Draft directive on the corporate taxation of a significant digital presence:
These rules shall not apply if an entity is resident for tax purposes in a non-EU jurisdiction (e.g. Switzerland) that has a double tax convention (DTC) in force with the relevant Member State, and if the DTC does not provide for a taxable digital presence (which is currently the case for all Swiss DTCs). Hence, groups operating out of Switzerland are expected to be affected by this potential measure only in the longer term, i.e. when DTCs are renegotiated (as proposed in the EU Commission’s Recommendation) to include the taxable digital presence, subject also to any further OECD developments.

For further details on the progress of the OECD work in this respect as well as for a summarised overview of the different approaches between the OECD and the EU, please find here OECD’s Interim Report 2018 respectively our PwC Tax Policy Bulletin.

Overall, the attractiveness of Switzerland as a location for digital businesses is not negatively impacted compared to the EU as a result of these directive proposals.

Related VAT Aspects

Even if the digital taxation proposals implicate significant changes in the corporate tax landscape, from an indirect tax (VAT) point of view the taxation of turnovers for digitally provided services at the place of the consumer (B2C) is already in force in the EU since 2015. However, the question remains whether the digital presence will also affect the definition of fixed establishments for VAT purposes and such change would have a major impact on how digitally provided services would be taxed in a B2B context.

Current position of Switzerland regarding taxation of digital economy

The State Secretariat for International Finance (SIF) recently has performed an analysis regarding the taxation of the digitalised economy and is generally committed to tax rules that allow for and promote fair competition. However, there have not been any concrete measures yet. In any case Switzerland holds the opinion that measures outside the scope of DTCs are to be avoided and interim measures (e.g. DST) should be limited in scope and time. Read SIF’s position on taxing the digitalised economy here.

Call for action

At this stage it is not clear yet whether respectively how the proposed directives will be adopted by the EU (formal adoption still pending and subject to unanimity among the EU Member States). Further, also the developments on the OECD BEPS project should be taken into consideration and monitored.

Nevertheless, it is recommendable for groups operating out of Switzerland to:

  • identify the digital services rendered in each of the EU Member States;
  • start performing impact assessments of (i) the DST and (ii) a taxable digital presence in the EU Member States, and
  • continue monitoring the EU legislative process and potential unilateral country measures (such as the unilateral measures in Italy, introducing a new tax on digital transactions effective January 1, 2019).

Your contacts

Stefan Schmid
Tel. +41 58 792 44 82
E-Mail: stefan.schmid@ch.pwc.com

Anna-Maria Widrig Giallouraki
Tel. +41 58 792 42 87
E-Mail: anna-maria.widrig.giallouraki@ch.pwc.com

Christa Elsässer
Tel. +41 58 792 42 66
E-Mail: christa.elsaesser@ch.pwc.com

Jeannine Haiböck
Tel. +41 58 792 43 19
E-Mail: jeannine.haiboeck@ch.pwc.com