21st CEO Survey: Key findings from the Insurance industry

Maintaining optimism while grappling with transformational changes

According to PwC’s 21st CEO Survey, insurance CEOs continue to report that theirs is one of the most disrupted industries. However, their outlook is increasingly positive. Half of insurance CEOs say that they believe global economic growth will improve over the next 12 months, up from only 19% in 2017. And more than 90% report that they are confident about their own organisations’ revenue prospects over the next three years (43% are very confident and 49% are somewhat confident).

Among the many reasons for the positive outlook is that the anticipated disruption from incoming competitors (e.g. InsurTech and digital platform players) hasn’t materialised to the extent that was feared. Indeed, partnership with new entrants rather than rivalry is the order of the day. Moreover, new risk mitigation opportunities – sensors and cyber assessments, for instance – are opening up.

But, having perhaps overestimated the impact of outside threats and short-term disruption in the past, could insurers now be underestimating the urgent need to become digitally-enabled, customer-focused organizations with flexible business and operating models?

Read the full study

 

Contacts

Immy Pandor
Insurance Sector Leader
PwC Switzerland
immy.pandor@ch.pwc.com

Patrick Maeder
Financial Services Leader
PwC Switzerland
maeder.patrick@ch.pwc.com

Jan Ellerbrock
Head of Insurance Management Consulting
PwC Switzerland
jan.ellerbrock@ch.pwc.com

Russian Football Premier League: A comprehensive study of the economics of Russian football

Regular football fans – and football industry insiders – have plenty to look forward to in Russia. In the run-up to the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia this summer, our colleagues of the Sports Consulting Practice at PwC Russia has joined forces with the Russian Football Premier League to survey the country’s top league. In the report they explore areas such as infrastructure, commercial deals, attendance and fan engagement – and benchmark the finances of the cream of Russian clubs against their counterparts in the leading European leagues.

In this blog post we introduce a few of the key findings by way of a taster. The authors − Oleg Malyshev, Aleksander Kardash and Anastasia Shalimova at PwC Russia – report that top Russian football is making up ground, both in sporting and business terms, on the leading leagues in Europe. The four most promising developments are as follows:

State-of-the-art infrastructure and technology boosting fan enjoyment and revenues
Currently in its sixteenth season, the Russian Football Premier league has formulated a strategy designed to maximise commercial revenue over the next few years. By providing better insights into the economics of the Russian game, the first survey of the league, conducted by PwC and entitled Russian Football Premier League: a comprehensive study of the economics of Russian football, is an important stepping stone towards this goal.

Obviously the upcoming FIFA World Cup, to be held in Russia this summer, is generating a great deal of excitement. But the league – and its member clubs – are determined to actively leverage the effects. The World Cup is giving clubs a great tool to attract people to watch the game, both regular fans and VIPs. Many of the stadiums built for the World Cup will debut this season. The new Saint Petersburg Stadium is already breaking match-day attendance records, new arenas are due to open in Ekaterinburg and Rostov-on-Don, and Dynamo Stadium in Moscow will soon reopen after a massive overhaul. The RFPL is also spearheading the adoption of new technology, with a new fan identification system about to be launched and video assistant referee systems currently being installed in stadiums.

Economic innovation also kicking off in Russian football
Technological innovation is being accompanied by the adoption of state-of-the-art business approaches. Russian football is becoming increasingly popular abroad, watched by fans in more than fifty countries and regions including Europe, Central and South America, Israel, China and the UAE. Twenty companies have purchased broadcasting rights to RFPL matches.

This growing popularity is one of the reasons sponsors are becoming more interested in top Russian football. Alongside increases in match-day revenue we’re seeing sponsors pay more attention both to the league and the clubs. The league’s title sponsor is Rosgosstrakh, and other important sponsors include Nike and Liga Stavok, a sports book.

New venues and technology-enabled means of direct-to-consumer sponsorship activation (such as social media, email, SMS and chatbots) are making it more interesting for FMSG companies to invest in advertisement in football.

Online no longer a mere sideline
Online sales are a big deal across the entire league. Most clubs now have online ticketing and merchandise stores, building up a strong presence on social media. As a result, some clubs now generate up to 80 percent of their regular ticket sales via online channels – their own website and mobile apps or third parties such as online ticketing aggregators. Even the average club already generates around 40% of total sales online.

Clubs are also pretty savvy when it comes to driving attendance by using promotions or offering free tickets or discounts. While only a third of RFPL clubs already use customer relationship management (CRM) systems to provide personalised service and boost fan loyalty, nearly half of all clubs plan on adopting CRM systems during the season.

UEFA penalties forcing more prudent financial management
Because of UEFA Financial Fair Play rules designed to help clubs achieve financial sustainability by striking a balance between their income and expenditure, clubs are required to be more prudent in terms of what they spend, and look for more and more ways to boost commercial revenues.

This vigilance is bearing fruit. Having paid UEFA penalties under the current rules, the financial activities of several clubs continue to be monitored. But there were no fines for violating financial fair play rules in 2016-17. These financial improvements are resulting in healthier competition on and off the field, and more attention paid to young local talent.

Conclusion: plenty to get excited about in Russia, both on and off the field
While there are still areas for improvement, in this World Cup year there’s plenty to get excited about in Russian football, with promising new developments both on and off the field. Clubs have increasing financial incentives to improve their sporting performance, build the loyalty and engagement of their fans, and modernise the way they go about their business. And they’re increasingly harnessing this potential by adopting smart technology and business approaches.

If you’d like to find out more, check out the report − Russian Football Premier League: a comprehensive study of the economics of Russian football  – or get in touch with me to discuss the opportunities in football and other sports in Russia.

21st CEO Survey: Key findings from the Asset and Wealth Management industry

Optimistic CEOS and buoyant growth, yet disruption looms

There’s great confidence in the asset and wealth management (AWM) industry, but also acknowledgement that times are changing. While CEOs are optimistic about growth, they’re aware that they face challenges, although perhaps not the full extent of them. Those are the inescapable conclusions of PwC’s 21st CEO Survey in which 126 of the sector’s CEOs were interviewed.

While AWM CEOs are optimistic about revenue growth in 2018, they also report seeing a myriad of challenges. This contrast begs the question: Will the extent of potential disruption outpace the time needed to prepare for and react to it?

Accelerating technological change, more demanding customers, embedding the blizzard of new regulation – these powerful forces will transform, and perhaps terminate, some of the sector’s traditional ways of operating. The survey’s findings echo the recent report, “Asset & Wealth Management Revolution: Embracing Exponential Change,” which estimates that by 2025 global assets under management will have almost doubled – rising from US$84.9 trillion in 2016 to US$145.4 trillion.

Yet certain AWM CEOs seem to underestimate the widespread industry reinvention under way, with major changes to fees, products, distribution, regulation, technology, and people skills, and how a failure to properly navigate these changes may cut into assets under management and eventual profits. Perhaps this is due to the disparate nature of the sector. It ranges from global giants to active and alternative investment boutiques. Many AWM participants in PwC’s 21st CEO Survey lead relatively small shops, reflecting the entrepreneurial nature of the industry.

Read the full study

Contact

Jean-Sébastien Lassonde
PwC | Partner, Swiss Leader Asset & Wealth Management
Office: +41 58 792 81 46 | Mobile: 41 79 598 57 38
Email: jean.sebastien.lassonde@ch.pwc.com

PwC research “Time to talk”: what has to change for women at work?

Many organisations are working hard to improve the Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) of their workforce, many with a specific focus on gender balance at leadership level. There is no one single bullet which can solve this complex challenge, it takes: time, commitment, vision and resilience to foster an Inclusive culture where everyone can flourish.

Recent PwC research “time to talk” highlights three areas for organisations for focus on to accelerate progress:

Transparency and trust – a way of conducting business in which employers offer their staff a clear understanding of the expectations on both sides of the employment equation.

What employers can do includes:

  • Provide consistent, accurate, accessible information about career progression and pay scales.
  • Hold open conversations with employees on where they stand and what is expected of them to advance.

Strategic support – networks mobilising women. Women need proactive networks of leaders and peers who will develop, promote and champion them at home and in the workplace.

What employers can do includes:

  • Role models of both genders to look up to and learn from
  • Mentors who help navigate the path to success
  • Sponsors who can push her to the next level
  • A circle outside of work who reinforce and support career aspirations

Life, family, care and work – we are all facing increasing demands from all walks of life, parenting, community for example, there is a need to find organisation solutions that work for all.

What employers can do includes:

  • Offer an on and off ramp strategy and policy, educating managers how to deal with returners to work, focussing on communication and a toolkit
  • Flexible friendly workplace, it is not just enough to have the policy, visible support is required from top leadership and education
  • Little visible steps can make big differences, for example a concierge at work or childcare solution support

A Diverse and Inclusive organisation is reached, one conversation at a time…

Read more about the PwC research “time to talk” and download the full report here.

 

PwC Switzerland
Sue Johnson
Tel. +41 58 792 90 98
sue.johnson@ch.pwc.com

PwC’s 2018 Global Economic Crime and Fraud Survey: Should Swiss companies be worried?

PwC’s Global Economic Crime and Fraud Survey 2018 reveals that 49% of global and 39% of Swiss organisations experienced economic crime in the last 24 months.

Could this mean that the problem is diminishing? Or are Swiss organisations simply not aware they have already fallen victim to economic crime?

In this blog post we will be examining the true nature of the threat and exploring whether companies be taking smarter measures to combat economic crime.

Does an apparent decline in fraud reflect the true story?
Despite a number of recent high profile fraud cases globally, PwC’s Global Economic Crime Survey suggests that the problem isn’t proliferating in Switzerland. The percentage of Swiss organisations who have experienced fraud in the last two years has decreased from 41% in 2016 to 39% in 2018. This figure looks even more positive when compared with the global (49%) or western European (45%) results. But is the result really that good?

We believe it isn’t. The survey data reveals some disconcerting facts.

Bribery and corruption are increasingly on the radar. In 2018, 27% of the Swiss respondents reported that they had been asked to pay a bribe, up from 9% in 2016. One in five respondents (20%) believe that their firms lost an opportunity to a competitor who paid a bribe within the last 24 months, up from 11% in 2016. While this shows growing awareness of, and confidence in acknowledging bribery and corruption, it also suggests that companies have to become even more alert to the threat of the problem and its implications in terms of competitiveness.

Secondly, the mean direct loss attributable to each incident of fraud in Switzerland was almost CHF 10 million – more than five times the global figure. While this may be due in part to the size of the Swiss economy and the prominence of banking and financial services sector– a particularly attractive target for fraudsters – it demonstrates that this is not a trivial problem. The size of monetary damage is significant.

Fighting fraud blindfold, or with eyes wide open?
While the lower fraud level reported in Switzerland may be due to an effective legal framework and law enforcement system, it could also reflect a temptation for organisations to overestimate the effectiveness of their systems and controls. Only one in three (33%) Swiss respondents performed a general fraud risk assessment over the two-year survey period which is substantially less than respondents globally (54%). Against this backdrop there’s a considerable risk that economic crime will go unnoticed and unreported, especially if an organisation doesn’t have access to management reporting concerning fraud.

Fraudsters down but not out, and moving quickly with the times
Swiss respondents reported that asset misappropriation (51%) and cybercrime (44%) were the two most common types of fraud experienced by their organisation with the latter also being perceived as a significant threat in the future. In order to be adequately prepared, organisations need to keep track of changes in the overall fraud risk landscape and the fact that Swiss respondents recognise cybercrime as the most significant risk going forward is encouraging.

However, our survey – both globally and in Switzerland – suggests that there’s still a failure to recognise the true nature of the threat, especially with growing business and consumer digitisation, the increasing sophistication of attacks, and heightened data security expectations amongst stakeholders. As the latest digital technologies help fraudsters become more strategic in their goals and more sophisticated in their methods, companies urgently have to make cybersecurity – the mitigation of cybercrime – a boardroom priority.

Unlike other types of fraud, cybercrime is a means to commit other types of fraud rather than being a stand-alone offence. Three in ten Swiss respondents suffered disruption to their business processes after having been the victim of a cyber-attack. More than a quarter of Swiss respondents (28%) were a victim of extortion and more than a fifth (23%) reported that a cyber-attack was used as a conduit to commit asset misappropriation against their organisation.

Efforts have to be more intelligent and better coordinated
While the 2018 survey shows that Swiss firms are taking cybercrime seriously, it also suggests that they need to work harder to be in line with global standards. Best practice organisations have adopted a ‘three lines of defence’ model, dividing responsibilities between functions that own and manage risk, those that oversee or specialise in risk management and those that provide independent assurance. It’s important to ensure that each of these functions also adequately addresses cyber risks.

In reality, only 54% of Swiss respondents have an operational cybersecurity programme, 5% below the global average and 7% below the average for Western Europe. Overall the global survey reveals serious blind spots when it comes to recognising the specific risks of fraud and economic crime. The trick is to recognise these blind spots before any fraud incident takes place. While it’s encouraging that 92% of Swiss firms expect to either significantly increase (6%), increase (25%) or maintain (61%) the amount of funds used to combat fraud, the issue is more about how these funds are actually spent. Presently, the stumbling block is often a lack of coordination and a failure to see the big picture.

The areas of a business that investigate fraud, manage fraud risks and report to the board or regulators are often disjointed and siloed. If each department builds a programme based on their own perception of fraud, operational gaps will eventually arise. So it’s vital to ensure all stakeholders understand the big picture of fraud risk management and how their own function fits into it. For global companies, establishing a centralised fraud detection and investigation function is a very good starting point.

And for any organisation, we can suggest four golden rules of effective fraud prevention:

Instant takeaway: four steps to fight fraud

  • Recognise fraud when you see it
  • Take a dynamic approach
  • Harness technology
  • Invest in people, not just machines

Follow these rules of thumb and you’ve already increased your chances of navigating an increasingly complex economic crime landscape. If you want to find out more, check out PwC’s Global Economic Crime and Fraud Survey 2018, and the deep dive into the Swiss findings ((link)), or contact us for a more in-depth conversation about how to tackle fraud and economic crime.

Digital IQ: focus on the human experience and technology integration

This is the tenth year running we’ve conducted PwC’s Global Digital IQ® Survey. The findings are sobering: enterprises all over the world are struggling to unlock the desired value. In most cases they’re overlooking fundamental integration of technology with the human experience of customers and employees. Compared with previous years there has been a decline in corporate digital IQ.

For the last ten years we and our colleagues at PwC all over the world have been polling the digital intelligence quotient of enterprises. For the 2017 edition, from September to November 2016 we asked more than 2,200 executives in 53 countries about digitisation trends and their impact on their organisation. In Switzerland 53 people took part, most of them chief information officers (CIOs) or heads of IT.

What makes a champion?

The so-called top performers, in other words organisations with sales and margin growth of more than 5%, consider the definition of ‘digital’ to be broader. They’re engaged in far-sighted, customer-oriented technology activities that go beyond mere digital technology to take in other aspects of business. When these companies run digital projects they involve cross-disciplinary teams with representatives from various fields of expertise and technology to revolutionize the human experience (employee & customer experience). They also use agile methods for the majority of projects, even those not involving software development.

Where do Swiss companies stand out?

Executives at Swiss companies rate the digital IQ of their CIO by international standards higher than their counterparts abroad (89% in Switzerland versus 83% worldwide). But the figure for CEOs is lower than the global average (54% versus 62%).

When it comes to innovativeness, Swiss companies do less well by international standards, with only 54% systematically venturing to take on new technologies (versus 76% in other countries). Swiss organisations take a different approach to exploring new technologies than their counterparts abroad, and are more likely to join forces with other industry leaders or technology vendors.

What determines digital success?

Digital initiatives are successful when aligned with a digital strategy that’s clear and understandable for all the stakeholders involved and that brings about changes in corporate culture. Transformation always has to take account of the perspectives of employees and partners such as suppliers and customers.

Digitally ambitious enterprises are able to draw together different aspects to enable harmonious, value-adding transformation. By integrating the business, the customer and employee experience, and the relevant technologies, they’re able to achieve lasting competitive advantage.

Want to know more about our study? You’ll find a summary of the Swiss findings here. You can also download the international edition of the Global Digital IQ® Survey:

Global Digital IQ Survey

Contact

Christoph Müller
Senior Manager, CIO Advisory
+41 58 792 27 86
christoph.mueller@ch.pwc.com

Axel Timm
Partner, Business Technology
+41 58 792 27 22
axel.timm@ch.pwc.com

Holger Greif
Partner, Advisory
+41 58 792 13 86
holger.greif@ch.pwc.com

Assess your organisation’s Diversity & Inclusion program with PwC

We know that Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) is good for business. Organisations that invest in D&I report seeing a number of advantages, such as an increased ability to attract talent, greater innovation and improved financial performance.

At PwC, we’ve found that the most effective D&I programs are comprised of four dimensions:

  • Understanding the Facts of Today
  • Building an Inspirational Strategy
  • Equipping Leaders for success
  • Creating Sustainable Movement

Take our short survey to assess your organisation’s Diversity & Inclusion program

Our new survey enables you to self-assess your maturity across those dimensions.

Click here to take our short survey and get your personnal Inclusion & Diversity assessment

The survey is short and easy to use, and when you finish the survey, you’ll receive an assessment of where your program is strongest and where there are areas of opportunity, as well as providing a benchmark of how you compare to others in your region and industry.

Take our short survey and get your personnal Diversity & Inclusion assessment

For more information on interpreting the results for your organisation or advice on how to become more Diverse and Inclusive, please contact Sue Johnson:

Sue Johnson
Senior Manager, Inclusion & Diversity, PwC Geneva
sue.johnson@ch.pwc.com / +41 58 792 90 98

Insights: Football leagues 2.0

The last two decades have seen a significant increase in the global appeal of sports leagues and teams which have broken national and continental boundaries. Some leagues, most notably the Premier League and the NBA, have been pioneers in taking their sports to new markets, with others following suit by leveraging their brand and sporting achievements in pursuit of the commercial opportunities presented by new markets.

As an example, the recent launch of a new brand identity by Juventus FC, who swapped the Torino crest for a sleeker and more neutral logo, was welcomed by sports marketers as a bold move to establish the team as an ambitious sports brand that is not confined within the limited geographical and commercial borders of Italian football. On the other hand, Juve fans in Torino were more sceptical about the move, expressing their fear that the club is losing its roots and affiliation with its home city.

Another interesting trend is the rise in new football leagues in the US and Far East paying hefty sums to attract talent to the top of their game from established European leagues, such as Shanghai International Port Group F.C.’s acquisition of Brazilian stars Hulk and Oscar, while at the same time trying to nurture home-grown talent. Although perhaps not sustainable, for sports brands the commercial attractiveness of these markets is undeniable.

Based on these developments, what are some of the scenarios we might see play out in the future?

1. Geographical expansion of leagues and clubs 
With leagues and clubs generally not being able to scale their business internationally at the desired pace, a potential geographical expansion to new territories could start with early regular season games being played abroad (similar to the NBA). This could pave the way for the creation of new inter-continental league formats with the participation of teams from multiple continents.

2. Creation of a new closed league system in Europe with guaranteed spots for top teams based on their commercial and sporting performance
Euroleague Basketball pioneered the first closed league system in Europe, and although it is embroiled in an ongoing dispute with the FIBA, football clubs and governing bodies can draw many lessons from its experience. So far, the UEFA has managed to stave off any breakaway efforts to create a European Super League by working closely with the ECA and conceding more privileges to the elite clubs. Nevertheless, top European clubs may well continue to seek to increase their popularity and revenues across borders by developing a more attractive competition format with guaranteed spots and a match schedule suitable for their international fan base.

3. Proliferation of new leagues and formats leveraging existing sports brands, such as e-sports or women’s leagues
Paris St-Germain, Manchester City FC and FC Schalke 04 are some of the latest clubs to create e-sports franchises in the hope of tapping into new demographics and geographies. Additionally, women’s football has gained significant popularity in mature sports markets through the performance of their national teams (e.g. USA, Japan, Australia, Canada, UK), representing fertile ground for the expansion of women’s football leagues.

In sum, as big football clubs shift their focus to new fan bases to sustain their growth, the commercial appeal of scenarios such as those mentioned above will become increasingly difficult to ignore. Keep an eye on our site for all the latest developments.

Contacts:

David Dellea
Advisory Director
+41 58 792 2406
david.dellea@ch.pwc.com

Ioannis Meletiadis
Advisory Manager
+41 58 792 1462
ioannis.meletiadis@ch.pwc.com

 

The end of trust? Balancing privacy with profits in the digital world

Over the past 20 years, technology has penetrated our business and personal lives at a speed and on a scale that few would have predicted. Yet while technology creates enormous opportunities, it also exposes us to significant risks. We can now source goods and services from across the world with a couple of mouse clicks, but that convenience comes at a price. Many of us, myself included, worry that we’re unintentionally compromising our privacy and the security of our personal data by shopping online.

As our markets leader in Switzerland, I had the good fortune to be in Davos last month where we launched our 20th CEO survey to the global media. I can’t remember a time when trust has been more prominent than it is today. Although it wasn’t a focus area in the earlier years of our CEO research, it’s been steadily climbing up the agenda. And most, the financial crisis and the political focus on the tax affairs of multinationals have eroded both customers’ and other stakeholders’ trust in businesses. Our survey shows how heavily this erosion is weighing on CEOs. More than half (58%) were worried that a lack of trust in business would harm their business, a significant jump from 37% in 2013.

In some respects, technology has made us more trusting than before. This is best demonstrated by the sharing economy, where digital platforms connect strangers who are willing to share cars and homes. Overall, however, technology is acting as a drain on trust, especially where people believe they are dealing with ‘faceless corporations’ instead of someone like themselves. A never-ending stream of cyber attacks, system disruptions and phishing scams creates the impression – accurately, in many respects – that the internet is not a safe place. We increasingly have to differentiate ‘real news’ from ‘fake news’ and we fear that governments and companies are abusing our personal information. No wonder more than two-thirds (69%) of CEOs are firmly convinced that it’s getting harder for businesses to gain – and retain – people’s trust.

Customer data is a great asset to companies, which use it to influence purchasing behaviour. It will be an even greater asset still once the Internet of Things has expanded to include host of devices ranging from smart watches and heart monitors to refrigerators and cars. Understandably then, customer data is probably the most pressing trust issue for CEOs, with 91% saying that breaches of data privacy and ethics will have a negative impact on stakeholder trust in the next five years. Our research suggests they are right to hold this view since 84% of people we spoke to at the same time as we surveyed the CEOs confirmed that breaches do indeed undermine their trust in companies.

Of course, companies will want to use data generated by the Internet of Things to serve their customers better, but they must also avoid intruding on their customers’ privacy or allowing their customers’ data to fall into the wrong hands (and indeed new EU regulations in the form of the General Data Protection Regulation will come into force next year to help further protect individual’s personal data).

Another major challenge to businesses is cyber espionage, the modern-day equivalent of industrial espionage. This is the practice of using computers to gain access to confidential information held by another organisation. Furthermore, more than half (53%) of CEOs are afraid that trust will be undermined by global cyber warfare – where government-backed hackers target another nation’s crucial energy or security infrastructure, commercial assets or mass transport system.

CEOs recognise that trust is an opportunity as well as a risk. Significantly, 64% of those surveyed believe that how their firm manages data will be a differentiating factor in future. The businesses that flourish will balance getting and using data with the social consequences of those actions. They will actively engage with stakeholders and invest heavily in their IT security, risk and governance strategies. Ultimately, in an environment where the line of acceptability regarding data usage will be constantly moving, the ability to earn trust will be one of the greatest determinants of business success. Read more about what’s on the mind of the CEO in our 20th CEO Survey.

New report: PwC’s 20th Global CEO Survey – Harnessing the power of human skills in the machine age

The talent challenge: Harnessing the power of human skills in the machine age

pwc_ceo survey_2017

With the rise of automation, we’ve reached a point where we’re questioning the role people play in the workplace. How to achieve the right mix of people and machines in the workplace is the critical talent question of our age.

Fifty-two percent of CEOs say that they’re exploring the benefits of humans and machine working together and 39% are considering the impact of Artificial Intelligence on future skills needs. This is a delicate balancing act for CEOs in every sector and region.

However, you can’t have a machine age without humans and 52% are planning to increase headcount over the next 12 months. They are focused on obtaining the skills that they need to create a world where humans and machines work alongside each other.

Different skills will be needed, roles will disappear and others will evolve. Some organisations will need fewer people, but others will need more. There will be a rebalancing of human capital as organisations adjust.

Exceptional skills and leadership will be needed, and yet 77% of CEOs say they see the availability of key skills as the biggest business threat. Todays in demand skills are exclusively human capabilities – adaptability, problem solving, creativity and leadership. Software cannot imitate passion, character or collaborative spirit. By marrying these skills with technology, innovation can thrive and organisations can succeed in competitive market places.

CEOs have an enormous challenge ahead of them; it is the role of business leaders to protect and nurture their people to show that in the technological age, humans are their priority.

Our new report – The talent challenge: Harnessing the power of human skills in the machine age – looks at the dilemmas facing CEOs and their HR teams in today’s environment and how their businesses can stay ahead.

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Download the full report here.

 

Contacts:

Hans Geene
Partner
+41 58 792 9124
hans.h.geene@ch.pwc.com

Charles Donkor
Partner
+41 58 792 4554
charles.donkor@ch.pwc.com